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September 2019

5 Home Decor Trends to Follow for 2020

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As 2019 comes to a close, new home decor trends are on the rise for 2020. Some of our favorite trends this year are making their way into the new year, while other trends are just starting anew. Keep your home trendy and classy with these five ongoing and new home decor trends.

  • Bring Life to Your Home

Add some freshness to your home with tasteful houseplants. If you’re not much of a green thumb, then look for low-maintenance plants such as succulents, snake plants (don’t worry, this plant gets its name solely from its looks), aloe vera, and Dracaenas. 

Not only will these plants add beauty to your home, but they also provide other benefits. For example, the juice from an aloe vera plant contains antibacterial properties, improves skin, and lowers blood sugar. Dracaenas help rid the air of harmful chemicals, which will ultimately increase the freshness and purification of the air in your home.  

  • Natural Wood Accents 

Cozy-up your home by adding some natural wood accents. Along with plants, wood seems to follow the trend of natural-elements that’s becoming more and more prevalent. Add wooden elements through picture frames, furniture, mirrors, and shelves. Complement your small succulent plants with custom floating shelves for your home.

  • Painted Parquet

Speaking of wood, give your home a creative pop with painted parquet floors. This new trend challenges the recently revisited trends of wallpapered walls and patterned tiles. Try to follow the overall feel of the space before painting the floors. If it’s a busy room, consider a simple wood stain. If the room is clean and basic, you may try adding a painted pattern to the floor, such as large diamond shapes.

  • Chalk it Up

While the farmhouse trend has slowly started to die down, we haven’t quite let go of the fun chalkboard decor that came with it. You can incorporate the natural wood trend by lining a chalkboard with thick wooden strips. Practice your lettering and calligraphy with chalk markers–which will withstand smudging 10x more than regular chalk. 

These elegant chalkboards are great for weekly scheduling, inspiring quotes, holiday themes, and silly sayings. You can place them in front entry-ways or prop them on an easel on a shelf for all your guests to admire. 

  • Lighten to brighten

Bright is the new black. For this trend, “bright” isn’t referring to throwing fluorescent colors all over your walls. Rather, the key is to brighten your home with the use of light. The more windows in a room, the better. However, not all rooms have the luxury of light access through windows. Even without windows, your home can feel bright through additional light fixtures and light tones. Brightening your home will create a more open and inviting space.

Keep up to date on the latest home decor trends by adding plants, wooden elements, painted floors, chalkboard art, and brighter themes to your home. Not only are these changes beautiful and trendy, but they will improve your living space through the use of air-purifying plants and brighter atmospheres.

partnered post • photo by Tina Dawson on Unsplash


6 Ways to Make Move-In Day Go Smoothly

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Moving into a new home or apartment is a very exciting time. Whether you’ve made a move across the country or just down the block, there’s a lot to do to get ready to move, actually move, and move-in. Here are a few ways to help your move-in day go as smooth as possible.

1) Prep the House

Homes are rarely ever empty. Especially bare-bones, nothing but the walls and floor empty. The perfect time to get a deep and crazy thorough cleaning of your house is right before you move in. Who doesn’t want to move into a perfectly clean house? Take a day before your actual move-in day to deep clean. While you are at it, be sure to be checking the basic features of the house. Check to make sure the hot water is working, the stove turns on, the freezer gets cold, and the heater or AC work. If it doesn’t work, call a company that does heating services near you and get it fixed ASAP. Moving is stressful; don’t add to the stress by having to deal with a broken furnace or water heater.

2) Label

Label, label, label. Label everything. Moving equals hundreds of cardboard boxes and storage containers. It is such a pain to try and locate things when nothing is labeled. Make life easier on yourself and as you pack up your stuff label the boxes. Write down the room the things belong to, and what items are inside. This way, after a long day of moving, you’ll know where the silverware is so you can eat that hard-earned Chinese takeout.

3) Start Early

Moving in takes a while. I promise it will take longer than you think it will. First, you have to unload the truck, get the boxes to the right room, and then unpack it all. Start early in the morning to give yourself an entire day to move in. There’s no way to make moving in a super fun process, so just realize that your entire day will be dedicated to moving. Trying to get it done as quickly as possible might make the process less painful though.

4) Have a System

Gameplan how moving-day is going to go before it actually arrives. Moving will go much more smoothly if you focus on doing one task at a time. The first task: unload boxes from the truck and put them in the room they belong to. Second up, or it could be first (depends on how you packed the moving truck), move in the heavy furniture. Third, unpack what you need for the night. You won’t have time to unpack everything the first night, and maybe not even the first few days, and that’s okay. Use your labeled boxes to find what you need for the first night like bathroom supplies, bedspreads, and pajamas, and don’t stress about the other boxes for the night.

5) Recruit Help

There’s a reason professional moving companies exist. Moving is not exactly a one-man job. So recruit some help! Ask friends or neighbors, or a local church leader if they know anyone who could help you move in. Be polite and don’t monopolize their day, but having an extra set of strong arms to move heavy furniture will be extremely useful.

6) Get Ready to Work

Moving in is kind of a mental game. It’s a bit mundane bringing box after box into the house, but there’s no way around that work. So mentally prepare yourself for the long day ahead of you and find the determination to get it done. Motivate yourself with a hearty breakfast, yummy lunch break, and reward yourself that night by eating out. I promise you won’t want to try and cook the night you move in, plus all your pans will probably still be in boxes.

partnered post • photo by Erda Estramera from Unsplash


What is Code Scaffolding in the Construction Industry?

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Code scaffolding is a term that gets thrown around quite frequently, in many industries. 

Scaffolding is now such a ubiquitous term that any form ‘supporting framework’ or structure is referred to as a scaffold, even if it is a virtual thing, such as the framework that computer code for applications is built around.

What interests us, of course, is not that kind of scaffolding but rather the construction form of scaffolding. 

There are codes of practice for how scaffolding should be used, and the way that it should be erected, to keep people safe. 

Code scaffolding focuses on how to ensure that people are safe and that the scaffolding is rated to support the right amount of weight, etc, when in use.

Scaffolding Best Practices

You may be familiar with building codes and regulations. Scaffolding is not classed as a building, so it is not subject to quite the same regulations.

However, there are still health and safety rules that govern how scaffolding should be erected and the type of scaffolding that can be used in a given situation.

Those rules differ for different parts of the world, but they are broadly similar in most developed countries with strict requirements on how tall scaffolding of different types can be and the number of platforms allowed at different heights.

Scaffolding Regulations and Requirements

Since scaffolding is not a permanent structure, it is governed by the general health and safety regulations for things such as working at heights. 

There are strict design requirements for scaffolds to ensure that they are stable on the ground and that they will not sink into the ground. 

The regulations also limit the minimum width of scaffolding to ensure that workers are able to move around safely while at a height, and they dictate how much weight a scaffolding installation should be able to safely handle, based on the height and intended use.

Scaffolding must be rated to handle the appropriate live load (usually 120kg per sq m for light-duty scaffolding) and also be able to support the weight of its own structure. 

This means that the design must take into account the number of expected platforms. 

Scaffolding is usually categorised into light, medium and heavy-duty applications. Light duty covers day to day use for things such as painting and decorating. 

Medium duty covers things like bricklaying and tiling, and heavy-duty is for other operations where someone may be moving large or heavy objects, working at elevation, or in a dangerous environment.

Putting Health and Safety First

Scaffolding is a tool, and when it is employed properly it makes working in hard to reach places and a height easy. 

You cannot afford to cut corners on scaffolding or use the wrong platform for the job. 

If you are not sure what kind of scaffolding you need for your construction project or you have any concerns about the practicality and safety of the scaffolding you are using, call a scaffolding expert like Skelscaff who offer everything from basic installation and rental to temporary fencing, heavy-duty scaffolding and more. 

partnered post • cc-licensed image by Andrew